Tag Archives: Charles H. Spurgeon

Spurgeon’s Voice on Singing

In Charles Spurgeon’s The Treasury of David, he expounds upon the 147th Psalm, which begins with

“Praise ye the LORD:
For it is good to sing praises unto our God;
For it is pleasant; and praise is comely.”
(v. 1, KJV)

Being that it is a Wednesday Wisdom day, I thought I’d get the wisdom from one of the world’s greatest preachers, the Prince of Preachers (the GOAT), and see what he has to say about singing–at home and at church.

Singing the divine praises is the best possible use of speech: it speaks of God, for God, and to God, and it does this in a joyful and reverent manner.  Singing in the heart is good, but singing with heart and voice is better, for it allows others to join with us. Jehovah is our God, our covenant God, therefore let him have the homage of our praise; and he is so gracious and happy a God that our praise may best be expressed in joyful song.

…It is pleasant and proper, sweet and suitable to laud the Lord Most High.  It is refreshing to the taste of the truly refined mind, and it is agreeable to the eye of the pure in heart: it is delightful both to hear and to see a whole assembly praising the Lord.  These are arguments for song-service which men who love true piety, real pleasure, and strict propriety will not despise.  Please to praise, for praise is pleasant: praise the Lord in the beauty of holiness, for praise is comely.  Where duty and delight, benefit and beauty unite, we ought not to be backward.  Let each reader feel that he and his family ought to constitute a choir for the daily celebration of the praises of the Lord. (The Treasury of David: Volume VII, Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1977, pp. 395-396.)

Spurgeon on Holiness and Evangelism

The following is an excerpt from The Soul Winner by Charles Spurgeon.  It is one of the best books on evangelism that I have read.

I am sure you would say, first of all, that a man who is to be a soul-winner must have holiness of character.  Ah! how few who attempt to preach think sufficiently of this! If they did , it would strike them at once that the Eternal would never use dirty tools, that the thrice-holy Jehovah would only select holy instruments for the accomplishment of His work.  No wise man would pour his wine into foul bottles; no kind and good parent would allow his children to go to see an immoral play; and God will not go to work with instruments which would compromise His own character.  Suppose it were well known that, if men were only clever, God would use them, whatever their character and conduct might be; suppose it were understood that you could get on as well in the work of God by chicanery and untruthfulness as by honesty and uprightness, what man in the world, with any feeling, would not be ashamed of such a state of affairs?  But, brethren , it is not so.  There are many in the present day who tell us that the theatre is a great school for morals.  That must be a strange school where the teachers never learn their own lessons.  In God’s school, the teachers must be masters of the art of holiness.  If we teach one thing by our lips and another by our lives, those who listen to us will say, “Physician, heal thyself.” “Thou sayest, ‘Repent.’ Where is thine own repentance?  Thou sayest ‘Serve God, and be obedient to His will.’ Do you serve Him?  Are you obedient to His will?”  An unholy ministry would be the derision of the world and a dishonour to God.  “Be ye clean, that bear the vessels of the Lord.”  He will speak through a fool if he be but a holy man.  I do not, of course, mean that God chooses fools to be His ministers; but let a man once become really holy, even though he has but the slenderest possible ability, he will be a more fit instrument in God’s hand than the man of gigantic acquirements, who is not obedient to the divine will, nor clean and pure in the sight of the Lord God Almighty.