Category Archives: Evangelism

High Commendation 1/12/19

Below are some articles, videos, etc. That I highly commend to you. I do not commend these simply because of the author or because of the subject, but because I have found value and help in reading or watching these. I will put a snippet of the article and then the link if you care to continue to read.

Jared Wilson explains why Christian movies are just plain bad. He has a number of points and I think it’s worth noting them. Much of it has to do with two different starting points (mindsets) of secular and Christian movies. And it isn’t what you may think.

Last month, while out at the movies, my wife and I happened to see trailers for two new movies produced by and for the Christian market — “faith-based films” they call them these days. Both trailers distilled their respective stories down to about 3 minutes of earnest dialogue snippets, tear-streamed dramatic moments, and inspirational footage of sports (basketball in one, track in the other). Throughout both trailers — which we saw on two different days before two different movies — the audience was audibly laughing. I was cringing. The paint-by-numbers aesthetic of the new wave of Christian movies persists in making the faith appear trite, inauthentic, corny, and — worst of all, as far as the culture goes — uncool.

To read more, click/tap on the link below:

Why Christian Movies Are So Terrible

 

Contrary to some, people who are dead and gone in Christian history are not old ghosts  who shouldn’t be read. In fact, many (not all) should be read, and then as always made sure that what they wrote in in accordance with Scripture. This is being Berean-esque. The following link is to a video (or transcript) of why we should read the puritans.

The Puritans have influenced me in huge ways throughout my life. I was nine years  old when I first came under conviction of sin. I felt my sinfulness, went to my dad’s bookcase, and I scanned all of his Puritan books. I saw The Life and Death of Mr. Badman by John Bunyan. I thought, Well, I’m a bad boy, so I better read that book. So, I made my way through it.

To watch the video click/tap on the link below:

Why Pastors (and All of Us) Should Read the Puritans

 

Below is a link to a Facebook video that I came across and found to be powerful. It is a young man evangelizing to the Jews in Israel. How he does it is simply astounding to me. To watch the video (you’ll need the sound on; the subtitles are too fast–at least for me) click/tap on the link below:

“The Forbidden” Chapter in the Hebrew Bible

Confidence Sharing Your Faith

John Robinson faced a dilemma. He had constructed a bridge across the Mississippi to connect two cities. It was the first of its kind (at least the first large bridge of its kind). It was made of steel girders and a cantilever form. It looked beautiful. So what was the problem? No one would use it. They didn’t believe that the bridge would be able to withstand the weight of heavy traffic, and who wants to be the one that causes the bridge to collapse? Robinson was incredulous. It was made of steel! However, being the creative man that he is, he went to the manager of a circus that was traveling through and asked to borrow an elephant. It was believed that elephants could “smell danger.” If the elephant found the bridge safe, so would the people. On June 14, 1874, he threw together a make-shift parade as the elephant made its way to Eads Bridge in St. Louis. Sure enough, the elephant crossed the bridge to East St. Louis, as the people followed suit. The bridge was strong enough–powerful enough–to withstand them all.

Why do I tell you this story? Because that’s the way it is with the gospel message. It is like Eads Bridge. As believers, we look at the gospel and see it as beautiful, graceful, and magnificent. We are indeed proud of the gospel. But what we doubt is its strength. So when we have the opportunity to share the gospel with someone else, we tend not to. We tend to shy away from it because we somehow believe that we are going to be the ones to make it crumble. In other words, we’re going to mess things up. We won’t have all the answers. We’re going to stumble our way through. We’re going to offend or mix up terminology. The whole thing is just going to collapse and we made it happen. So rather than fail, and fall with the collapsed bridge, we’d rather just not go there in the first place. This shows a misunderstanding of the weight of our abilities. At the same time, it reveals our distrust in the firmness and strength of the gospel. Thus, we waver.

Read the words that Paul wrote; read them carefully: “For I am not ashamed of the gospel, for it is the power of God for salvation to everyone who believes,” (Romans 1:16). The gospel is the power. It is the strength. It is the ability. I am sure that Eads Bridge had its weight limit, but it has been 145 years and it has not collapsed yet. There is no weight limit to the gospel message. It can hold us all (even if we get our words mixed up, don’t have the answers, don’t come off as the brightest bulb in the box). Remember these words: “For Christ did not send me to baptize but to preach the gospel, and not with words of eloquent wisdom, lets the cross of Christ be emptied of its power,” (1 Corinthians 1:17). Christ has not called us to be the brightest bulb in the box. He hasn’t called us to use perfect words or memorize some gospel presentation. The power is not in the presentation. The power is not in the person’s knowledge. The power is in the gospel. It can and will hold us up. We need not fear our inabilities, but believe in the power of the cross, the power of the gospel.

That being said. . . if you have about 6 minutes, I would encourage you to watch this video from Tim Keller on boasting in the blood. I promise it will be worth your time.