Category Archives: Evangelism

As Long as There is Breath

In the ancient lands what often took place was that the people would find a mountain, or if there were no mountains a hill, and they would use that as their capital city and the main place of worship.  They would build a temple to their greatest deity or deities as if to proclaim to all the other peoples around them or traveling through their cities that their god was watching over them.  Jerusalem was no different.  They had chosen Mt. Moriah, the mountain where Abraham had nearly sacrificed Isaac, also known as Mt. Zion to be their temple mountain and capital city (Jerusalem).

They had made a beautiful temple built at the instruction and care of Solomon.  It was one of the finest temples ever built in the ancient Near East.  It glittered in the sun. It shined in the night.  It could be seen for miles away.  It was a magnificent sight to see.  It is understandable why the elders of Jerusalem wept bitterly after coming back from Babylon and seeing the new temple that had been built.

If you have read Micah, you’ve probably noticed that he had proclaimed that the people of Judah were horrid people.  The government was corrupt, the prophets and priests were corrupt, and God was going to judge them.  They would lose everything.  They would be exiled and their lands would be destroyed.  The temple mountain would grow bushes and weeds because it would be torn down and abandoned.

But Micah, like God, loves the people too much to leave them in despair.  “It shall come to pass in the latter days that the mountain of the house of the LORD shall be established as the highest of the mountains, and it shall be lifted up above the hills; and peoples shall flow to it,” (Micah 4:1).

This is what we would call poetry parallelism: highest of the mountains = above the hills. Micah’s point here is simply that God’s mountain, Mt. Zion, His house, the temple will be greater than the others. God is establishing His greatness above the other gods.  The palace of God, the temple (both the same word in Hebrew) would be not only restored to its original greatness and popularity, but even greater than it has ever been.  The debate over who has the stronger, more powerful God will be over.  God will be the undisputed champion of the world!  Everyone will know it.  No one will doubt it. People will be coming from everywhere!

That’s what Micah tells us, “And many nations shall come, and say: ‘Come let us go up to the mountain of the LORD, to the house of the God of Jacob, that he may teach us his ways and that we may walk in his paths.’  For out of Zion shall go forth the law, and the word of the LORD from Jerusalem,” (Micah 4:2).

What’s that?  People all over the world, nations, which to the Jewish listener would mean Gentiles were coming to worship Yahweh, the God of the Jews.  In other words, God would not simply be the God the Jews but the God of the world.  His kingdom would be over everyone!  Not in some God created everything so He is the king of everything kind of ways, but people are coming from all over the world and worshiping God because they long to do so!

The word of the Lord is no longer confined to the people of Judah, but is spread all over the world.  It began in Jerusalem, but from there is spread like wild fire to the ends of the earth!  Does that sound familiar?  “But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you, and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the end of the earth,” (Acts 1:8).  By the time everything is said and done we will see what John saw:

After this I looked, and behold, a great multitude that no one could number, from every nation, from all tribes and peoples and languages, standing before the throne and before the Lamb, clothed in white robes, with palm branches in their hands, and crying out with a loud voice, “Salvation belongs to our God who sits on the throne, and to the Lamb! (Revelation 7:9-10).

What began 2,000 years ago will continue until Christ returns.  There is no limit it would seem to the people who come into this kingdom.  Nations, peoples, tribes, languages.  Think about those who are being persecuted in places like North Korea who have buried Christians alive, Afghanistan where people have put bounties on their own family member’s head because he/she became a Christian. People from those nations that seem like no one would ever believe (and every other nation) will come to know Jesus!  What we generally look at as a lost cause and a hopeless situation will turn around by the very gospel that we hold!  For the gospel is the power of God unto salvation for everyone who believes.  No one is outside the power of God’s gospel.  As long as there is breath there is hope.

Please leave me a comment; I’d love to read what you have to say. If you found this encouraging please feel free to share.

Do Denominations Destroy the Unity of the Church?

It has been said that Martin Luther tried to fix the church, but ended up breaking it into 20,000 pieces instead. That’s in reference to the more than 20,000 protestant denominations in the world. Is that a fair assessment? Did Luther effectively shatter the unity of the church? Are denominations destroying the unity of the church? To answer these questions, we need to start at the very beginning because, as Fraulein Maria taught us, “It’s a very good place to start.”

In Acts 15, we see that there is a Jerusalem Council because the Judaizers in Antioch are telling the Gentile believers that they need to become Jewish Christians (obedient to Jewish laws/customs, including circumcision) if they were to be actually Christian.  The apostles met together in Jerusalem to hear arguments, discuss the matter, and render a verdict.  Peter testified that Gentiles had indeed become Christians, having received the Holy Spirit just as the apostles (and believing Jews) had. He adds this crucial point, “And he made no distinction between us and them, having cleansed their hearts by faith. Now therefore, why are you putting God to the test by placing a yoke on the neck of the disciples that neither our fathers nor we have been able to bear? But we believe that we will be saved through the grace of the Lord Jesus, just as they will,” (Acts. 15:9). Paul and Barnabas give credence by their own testimony as to what Peter witnessed. Thus James, Jesus’ brother, gave the statement that circumcision was not necessary, and the Gentiles shouldn’t be burdened with such matters.  Why bring this up? Two reasons: 1) There were already signs of tension in the Church in the first 15 years or so from Pentecost. 2) It shows the supremacy of the gospel above all other church matters. And so, going to the letter to the Galatians by the Apostle Paul (personally, I believe this was pre-Jerusalem Council, though not all would agree with me), we see the same thing. “But even if we or an angel from heaven should preach to you a gospel contrary to the one we preached to you, let him be accursed,” (Galatians 1:8). So we see that the gospel is the central issue. As Peter said to the council, and the letter to the Galatians makes abundantly clear: the gospel is justification by faith alone through grace alone. All other church matters are of less importance than this one.

Lest we forget, soon after the Jerusalem Council, Paul and Barnabas parted ways. They had a sharp disagreement about John Mark (aka Mark) and whether or not he should be allowed to rejoin them having deserted them once already. This separation was not about a gospel issue, but a personal one. It was more about how the two men would do mission rather than what the mission would be. I am not saying that this is prescriptive (a sign or command to do what is read); it is certainly more descriptive (telling us what happened). My only point in bringing this up is to show that even the Apostle Paul and Barnabas (a nick-name meaning “Son of Encouragement”) separated for, at least, a time. But as we see the apostle and Mark were still on the same mission. “Luke is with me. Get Mark and bring him with you, for he is very useful to me for ministry,” (2 Timothy 4:11). Though there may be separation on how ministry is done, it does not mean that there is separation as to what that ministry is.

That being said. . .there are prescriptions in Scripture that tell us to sever ties. Because the gospel is the main issue, anything that messes with that is reason to divide. Remember the strong words of Paul: “let him be accursed.” There is no room for a changing or denial of the gospel. The Apostle John fleshed that out for us (pun intended as you shall soon see). “By this you know the Spirit of God: every spirit that confesses that Jesus Christ has come in the flesh is from God, and every spirit that does not confess Jesus is not from God. This is the spirit of the antichrist, which you heard was coming and now is in the world already,” (1 John 4:2-3).  To deny that Jesus came in the flesh is to deny the gospel, as Christ’s humanity is just as important as his divinity. Without one or the other, salvation is not possible, thus the gospel is no gospel. John told us, “If anyone comes to you and does not bring this teaching [Jesus in the flesh], do not receive him into your house or give him any greeting, for whoever greets him takes part in his wicked works,” (2 John 10-11).  Thus, if anything, one should be able to see that changing the gospel is reason for separation.

Last point before I get to answering the question. When the Apostle Paul wrote to the church of Rome, after explaining the gospel and doctrines of the faith, he started to apply it to daily living. In chapter 14, he dealt with the issues of matters not so black and white within Scriptures. Some people didn’t mind eating meat, others abstained eating only vegetable. Some celebrated holidays that others thought they shouldn’t. To these matters he told the Romans (and us), “Each one should be fully convinced in his own mind,” (v. 5). This is what I would deem “the conscience clause.” If the matter is not clear in Scripture (in other words, we don’t have to do mental gymnastics to make it say what it doesn’t say), then we let conscience decide, and in the spirit of unity other believers let it be determined as such.

So let us take all that we’ve learned so far and apply it to denominations.

  1. The gospel is the central issue. There are cults that claim to be Christian, but deny the gospel or that which is pertinent to the gospel, thus changing the gospel. Two of the more widely accepted cults thought to be Christian but are not: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (following the teachings of Joseph Smith) and The Jehovah’s Witnesses (following the teachings of Judge Rutherford; begun by Charles Taze Russel). There are “denominations” who deny the Trinity which goes against clear biblical teaching, which changes the gospel, and thus are heretical and by definition cannot be part of the Church.
  2. Just because there are thousands of denominations does not mean that we are not on mission together. We may have our different ways (the how) we do missions and ministry, but we agree on what that mission is: to spread the gospel of Jesus Christ throughout the world.  We may have parted ways on how to do it, but we are united in that it must be done. Each of our ministries are useful to each other.
  3. Much of the “division” is secondary or tertiary (third-level) doctrines. Often these are polity issues–how a church ought to be governed. Some churches/denominations believe in congregationalism (congregations rule). Some churches/denominations believe in elder rule (some go further to a presbytery board), while others believe that bishops govern local parishes or churches. Some churches believe in believers’ baptism (credo-baptism), while others believe that infants ought to be baptized (paedo-baptism). Some believe that speaking in tongues continues on today while others say they ceased after the first century or so.  To these issues we tend to let conscience move us forward. There is no clear biblical teaching that says “You must do it this way.” Instead, there are descriptions and honest attempts at understanding how those descriptions (and what are clearer teachings/principles) are to be applied.

So did Luther shatter the church? No. Not if by the church you mean those who confess that Jesus, God the Son, came in the flesh, lived the perfect life as our example, died the death that we deserved, rose from the dead three days later, and ascended to heaven. That is the gospel and all who believe it are part of the Universal Church which can never be divided. Denominations are not destroying the unity of the church; in fact, they are expanding the mission and ministry of the church.

In baseball, you have nine players on the field; each one playing their own position in which they are skilled. Yet, all nine players have one mission: to win the game (ultimately to go to the championship-varsity, college, or pros). They aren’t alone though; there are other teams, and in one way they compete with each other, but in another way they propel each other to greater and greater playing abilities. Thus there is scouting, recruiting, learning, advances in technology, and such. Those teams make up a division, a conference, a league; in essence, one large team, scattered and sectioned off for the greatness of baseball. So it is with the church: one large Church, scattered and sectioned off for the glory of Christ and the spread of the gospel.

Surely there will be those who disagree with me. I would love to hear from you. Please leave me a comment below. If this article was helpful, please let me know with a like and/or comment as well. If you believe others would benefit from this article, please feel free to share it across the social media spectrum. I look forward to reading your comments.