Spurgeon’s Voice on Singing

In Charles Spurgeon’s The Treasury of David, he expounds upon the 147th Psalm, which begins with

“Praise ye the LORD:
For it is good to sing praises unto our God;
For it is pleasant; and praise is comely.”
(v. 1, KJV)

Being that it is a Wednesday Wisdom day, I thought I’d get the wisdom from one of the world’s greatest preachers, the Prince of Preachers (the GOAT), and see what he has to say about singing–at home and at church.

Singing the divine praises is the best possible use of speech: it speaks of God, for God, and to God, and it does this in a joyful and reverent manner.  Singing in the heart is good, but singing with heart and voice is better, for it allows others to join with us. Jehovah is our God, our covenant God, therefore let him have the homage of our praise; and he is so gracious and happy a God that our praise may best be expressed in joyful song.

…It is pleasant and proper, sweet and suitable to laud the Lord Most High.  It is refreshing to the taste of the truly refined mind, and it is agreeable to the eye of the pure in heart: it is delightful both to hear and to see a whole assembly praising the Lord.  These are arguments for song-service which men who love true piety, real pleasure, and strict propriety will not despise.  Please to praise, for praise is pleasant: praise the Lord in the beauty of holiness, for praise is comely.  Where duty and delight, benefit and beauty unite, we ought not to be backward.  Let each reader feel that he and his family ought to constitute a choir for the daily celebration of the praises of the Lord. (The Treasury of David: Volume VII, Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1977, pp. 395-396.)

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